Landsforeningen Autisme

Princess Marie, as Patron, supports online campaign ‘Autism Acceptance – There is Plenty to Fight For’ for World Autism Day

Today is World Autism Awareness Day and Princess Marie celebrated the day as Patron of the Danish Association for Autism by releasing a video message. (Video and translation below the cut)

The Danish Association for Autism held a conference in Høje Taastrup today. This conference was especially for autistic people and it featured presentations on self-understanding, anxiety and “a better life”.

Kirsten Callesen, from the Psychological Resource Center, started out with a presentation on self-understanding in people with autism and she also made a presentation on anxiety, depression and sensory disturbances. Ellen Vallentin Christiansen made a presentation titled “A better life” and Ole Anders Rauff gave a presentation on being a “Power Autist”. Rauff’s presentation aimed to give “good advice on how to as an autist take care of himself and keep an eye on whether other people want one the best in a relationship.”

Princess Marie was in Tonder today to attend the Wegner Prisen with Prince Joachim but as she is Patron of the association and as autism is a cause close to her heart, she recorded a video message in which she focused on acceptance and understanding of autism in society – and on the importance of having room for all of us.

“Dear everyone,
I want to send you a little greeting. World Autism Awareness Day is one day of the year therefore it is important that we spend the day deciding how we will handle the 364 other days. Only by accepting, acknowledging, understanding and most importantly, making space for everyone can we create a world for all. A place where each one is seen and received with acceptance and a world where no one loses, simply because everyone is winners.
I’m sorry I can’t be with you today and I wish you a good conference.”

The video was released in connection with an online campaign made by the Association for the day. On their Facebook account, they share facts and numbers of the many improvements for people with autism and their families that we all fight for in society. There will be 24 stories in total, one for each hour. The aim of the campaign is to promote acceptance and to show that people with autism are worth fighting for. Here are all of them (translation below the images).

This is the 12th time the International World Autism Acceptance Day is held. We must create a framework in our society that makes everyone a part of the community – for everyone wins when no one loses.

Too many people with autism are placed in temporary residences and are not assured of tenant rights, and must fear being moved. People with autism should be entitled to their own inviolable home. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

In 2018, resident staff were entitled to use power against a resident who does not want to brush teeth or in baths. No one should be subjected to power or retention rather than relationship and pedagogy. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

67% of parents of children with autism feel stressed in meeting the public. All families affected by autism must be entitled to one unifying disability counselor – one entry to the municipality. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

Only 1 in 10 adults with autism is in regular work. We need more acceptance in Danish jobs. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

40% of children with autism experience their schooling negatively. The development must be reversed through better understanding and knowledge of autism. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

Autism is not a disease or a fault to be cured or medicated. People with autism need acceptance, relationships and equal access to schools and jobs

53% of parents of children with autism experience that the children have conflicts in school. The level of conflict must be reduced through more specialization in schools. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

65% of parents of a child with autism have a poorer connection to the labor market. Make the labor market more flexible. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

Statistically, everyone knows at least 10 people with autism. All people with autism are entitled to respect from friends, schoolmates, colleagues and family, and from the rest of society. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

35% of all children with autism do not go to school. All children have the right to a school offer where they participate and develop!
Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

People with autism at home participate less often in health screening for, for example, cancer than people without disabilities. Everyone has the right to equal access to health. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

Autism is a complex neurological disability that requires high specialization. The specialized social area cannot be handled in the municipalities. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

Too many people with autism get their diagnosis too late. Early diagnosis gives the best home. More people with autism should be diagnosed in childhood. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

Only 49% of young people with autism and other disabilities have completed their education. For people without disabilities, the figure is 80%. It should be easier for people with autism to take an education. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

In 2018, the Parliament adopted the discrimination ban. It was illegal to discriminate on the basis of disability. But there is still no requirement for reasonable adaptation, so that education, companies and municipalities can still refrain from making themselves accessible. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

17% of parents of children with autism experience their child being bullied in school. Primary schools must have more knowledge about autism. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

The risk of dropping out of higher education is twice as high for young people with autism and other disabilities, as for young people without disabilities. Make the programs more flexible and give young people with autism mentors and extra time. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

Parents of children with autism must never come into a situation where they hesitate to seek help from the municipality because they are afraid that the municipality will threaten to place their child. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

9% of all children and adolescents aged 0-17 have autism. In the period 2010-2016, the figure has increased by 46%.
Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

36% of the complaints in the Complaints Board for Special Education concern children with autism in school. Mistakes are all too often made because the municipalities and schools lack knowledge about autism. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

Autism does not disappear because you become an old-age pensioner. There is a need for specialist knowledge of autism in elderly care. Autism Acceptance Day – there is plenty to fight for.

40% of parents of a child with autism feel ill-treated or even misunderstood or violated in the meeting with the public. The municipalities must be obliged to provide specialized case processing. Autism Awareness Day – There Is Enough To Fight For!

In the video, Princess Marie is wearing her white Zara jacket.

©Zara
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.