Visits

Princess Marie attends Princess Marie-Esmeralda of Belgium’s presentation of her 2014 book ‘Dix Femmes Prix Nobel de la Paix’ (10 Women who won the Nobel Peace Prize)

Today, Princess Marie – accompanied by Chares-Henri Keller- attended an event celebrating the women who won the Nobel Peace Prize in Rungsted. Let’s take a look at these women’s accomplishments as they were exposed during today’s event.

©Annemette Kuhlmann

The Belgian Embassy and the Karen Blixen Museum have joined forces to invite her Royal Highness Princess Esmeralda of Belgium to present her book “Dix Femmes Prix Nobel de la Paix” (10 Women who won the Nobel Peace Prize).

©Annemette Kuhlmann

Princess Esmeralda, who has a career as a journalist, has met these strong, visionary and brave women, and has written a compelling story about them. The organizers of the event said they choose to host the event at the Karen Blixen museum because :“All these protagonists remind us of Karen Blixen, who was a pioneer in her art as in her life within topics such as women’s fate and environment.”Lise Bach Hansen from the Royal Library interviewed the Princess and Catherine Lefebvre, director of museums, introduced her.

In an interview back in 2014, Princess Esmeralda said that the book was made for women:“It is addressed primarily to women, obviously, because they are the real heroes. The message would be: if some of them have succeeded- by dint of courage and incredible energy- to achieve something, there are many who, in the shadows, work every day for peace.”

©Annemette Kuhlmann

As of today, seventeen women won the Nobel Peace Prize since its creation in 1901 but when Princess Esmeralda wrote the book in 2014, there were only sixteen and only ten of them were still alive. Princess Esmeralda met with nine of those women and wrote about their lives and their fights. The last chapter is about Malala Yousafzai who Princess Esmeralda couldn’t meet in person as the announcement of Malala being awarded the Prize was made only a few weeks before the release of the book. The first woman who won the Nobel Peace Prize was Baroness Bertha Sophie Felicita von Suttner, née Countess Kinsky von Chinic und Tettau in 1905 for writing Lay Down Your Arms and contributing to the creation of the Prize.

©Annemette Kuhlmann

Mairead Corrigan and Betty Williams (1976, Northern Ireland): Founders of the Northern Ireland Peace Movement (later renamed Community of Peace People)

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Aung San Suu Kyi (1991, Myanmar): for her non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights. Aung San Suu Kyi was on house arrest at the time so she only received her prize in 2012.

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Rigoberta Menchú (1992, Guatemala): for her work for social justice and ethno-cultural reconciliation based on respect for the rights of indigenous peoples

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Jody Williams (1997, United States of America): for their work for the banning and clearing of anti-personnel mines (alongside International Campaign to Ban Landmines). This would be of particular interest for Princess Marie as she is working with Dan Church Aid on their campaign against landmines.

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Shirin Ebadi (2003, Iran): for her efforts for democracy and human rights. She has focused especially on the struggle for the rights of women and children. She is also the first woman to become a judge in Iran in 1974.

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Ellen Johnson Sirleaf & Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkol Karman (2011, Liberia and Yemen): for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf is also the first women to become President of an African country.

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Malala Yousafzai (2014, Pakistan): for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education (alongside Kailash Satyarthi from India)

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Since 2014, only one woman won the Nobel Peace Prize. Nadia Murad (Iraq) was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize last year alongside Dr Denis Mukwege (Democratic Republic of Congo) for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict.

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Princess Marie wore a new Ba&Sh dress for this event. As far as we know, it is the first time she has worn the French brand. It is the Rozy dress in green. She paired the dress with a new belt, the Betty belt by Ba&Sh too.

She also wore her favorite Jimmy Choo ‘Romy‘ pumps in black suede and her old By Malene Birger clutch. Her earrings and matching ring are old UFOs.

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